North Canberra Community Council

September 22 Newsletter

At last week’s NCCC General Meeting, the issue of integrated planning came to the fore during the Suburban Land Agency’s (SLA) presentation on the indicative land release program in North Canberra over the coming years. One of the areas of focus was Watson Section 76 (a greenfield site between Aspinall Street and the Federal Highway). The SLA noted the Place Plan for the area identified key themes for the future planning of Watson, such as ‘active people’ and ‘sustainable living’. North Watson residents would, however, be keenly aware that the current design of the suburb (as distinct from ‘old’ Watson) …

July 2022 Newsletter

The ACT Government has released for consultation the draft Active Travel Plan which outlines a strategy to enable more people to take up public transport or cycling as modes of transport across Canberra. Many North Canberra residents who commute to work via public transport or bike would be conscious of the major challenges with our networks. For those who do not live on the light rail line (or do not have their workplace near a light rail stop), public transport times can be prohibitively long due to the additional connecting buses. For those who cycle, the roads in some suburbs …

June 2022 Newsletter

The ACT Government recently released a guide for how to integrate climate-wise landscape design principles in new developments. It is intended to assist in the planning and design of climate resilient landscapes, including merging green landscapes with urban structures where possible and maximising trees and plants on the block. The guide is worth reading for anyone interested in the principles of climate resilient planning, but it’s another question entirely as to whether these principles can be integrated into new developments. A recent article by The RiotACT’s Ian Bushnell on a new dual occupancy development in Torrens highlights this tension, describing a …

May 2022 Newsletter

One of the novel aspects of debates about local planning laws and regulations is how technical and complex the rules are, requiring one to have an incredibly strong grasp of the Territory Plan, of ‘development codes’, ‘zone objectives,’ what is or is not permitted in particular zones, and the roles of different government agencies. Yet despite their opacity, these rules have fundamental implications for our streets and suburbs. They shape where we live and how we navigate our city, and yet it often feels like one must need tertiary qualifications in planning to understand them. In the past month, this …